Seaside, Oregon, is named after a summer resort built in the late 19th century by railroad mogul Ben Holladay. Seaside has many of the attractions one might expect from a beach town, including sandy beaches, an aquarium, and a long coastal boardwalk. As the final stop on the expedition of the Corps of Discovery, the group of explorers led by captains Lewis and Clark, Seaside also has great historical significance. Here are the best things to do in Seaside, Oregon. Scroll to see the full list with photos or jump to the table of contents.


The Seaside Promenade

The Seaside Promenade

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The Seaside Promenade, fondly known as the Prom, is a 1.5-mile-long boardwalk running alongside the Pacific Ocean in town. The Prom was initially built from wood in the 1920s, but today it has been paved over in concrete, making it a convenient route for joggers and cyclists.

On one side of the promenade are beautiful views of the Pacific Ocean and sandy dunes, while the other side shows off historical motels and beachside cottages. This Seaside hub also has a sightline to beautiful Tillamook Head and includes the famous End of the Trail statue of Lewis and Clark on a roundabout along its path.


Arcadia Beach State Recreation Area

Arcadia Beach State Recreation Area

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The Arcadia Beach State Recreation Area sits along the coast of Oregon where it meets the Pacific Ocean, creating a tranquil oasis with lovely ocean views and a calming seaside breeze. Located just south of Cannon Beach, the beach area here stretches for about a mile and opens up views of the rest of the coast as well as the headlands that form its borders.

This territory is less crowded than other nearby beaches, making it a choice spot to enjoy the seaside away from the crowds. The location has basic amenities for a trip to the beach, including restrooms and a picnic area.

US-101, Arch Cape, OR 97102, Phone: 503-986-0707


Camp 18 Museum

Camp 18 Museum

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The history of logging is proudly on display at Camp 18 Museum, an exhibit located on the property of the Camp 18 Logging Restaurant. At the outdoor museum, vintage logging equipment abounds, with some examples of the high-flying technology of the past, such as a large bandsaw, a steam-powered machinery, and a railroad log car, taking center stage.

Each piece of equipment has a placard beside it explaining its history and use. In addition, the museum holds an extensive vintage photograph collection, a portion of which is exhibited. The facility also actively participates in preservation and restoration efforts related to the logging industry.

42362 Highway 26, Elsie, OR 97138, Phone: 503-755-1818


Clatsop County Historical Society, Seaside, Oregon

Clatsop County Historical Society, Seaside, Oregon

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The Clatsop County Historical Society works to preserve the history of this part of Oregon by restoring and displaying some of its significant historic buildings for the public. In total, the society operates four different venues, which differ greatly from one another in terms of their styles and uses.

The Queen Anne-style Flavel House, which was built in 1884, provides information about the Victorian period, while the neoclassical Heritage Museum discusses the history of the entire county in its displays. The Uppertown Firefighter's Museum, a boxy red brick building, traces the history of firefighting in the region through a collection of memorabilia, which includes a 1946 Mack fire truck.

714 Exchange St, Astoria, OR 97103, Phone: 503-325-2203


Clatsop Plains

Clatsop Plains

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Clatsop Plains is the official and somewhat misleading name for an 18-mile stretch of sandy Pacific coast beach known to most by the more appropriate folk name of Clatsop Beach. The area is named for the Clatsop Native American tribe, who lived in the region in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

Clatsop Plains includes two beaches, Sunset Beach and Columbia Beach, and is the location of the Peter Iredale, the skeleton of a shipwrecked British sailing vessel. In addition to creating beautiful beach and inland areas, Clatsop Plains is also the place from which the state of Oregon harvests the vast majority of its razor clams.


Del Rey Beach State Recreation Site

Del Rey Beach State Recreation Site

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The Del Rey Beach State Recreation Site is a tranquil, secluded area that leads out to the majestic waters of the Pacific Ocean. Unlike other more popular beaches, Del Rey offers a quiet place to enjoy the sun and sand; beachcombers can relax, fish, play, or fly a kite in peace without any crowds or noise.

Facilities are also available that provide horseback rides along the beach. Those in search of razor clams come to this spot to harvest these special creatures of the Pacific Northwest and many stay into the evening to watch the sun set over the horizon. More Oregon Beaches

Warrenton, OR 97146, Phone: 800-551-6949


Ecola State Park, Seaside, Oregon

Ecola State Park, Seaside, Oregon

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Ecola State Park is another coastal beach park along the Pacific waters of Oregon. The park is located 2 miles to the north of well-known Cannon Beach and it has both sandy beach areas and inland hiking trails. The beach at Ecola State Park is known as Indian Beach and has a spacious area for relaxing by the waves and exploring in and around the tide pools.

Another favorite site at the state park is Ecola Point, which opens up views of the ocean and the rocky cliffs as well as of Tillamook Lighthouse. Eight miles of the Oregon Coast Trail run through the park and camping facilities are available to hikers.

84318 Ecola Park Rd, Cannon Beach, OR 97110, Phone: 503-368-5154


Fort Clatsop, Seaside, Oregon

Fort Clatsop, Seaside, Oregon

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Fort Clatsop, which sits inside the Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks, was used as an encampment site for the Corps of Discovery during the winter of 1805–1806. This national monument includes two main structures, a visitors center, and a replica of the fort itself.

The center has an interpretive area and exhibit hall, which provide information about the history of the site as well as two educational films and a gift shop. Visitors can explore the monument on a self-guided audio tour or hike or take an excursion with one of the on-staff rangers, who often dress up in period costumes.

92343 Fort Clatsop Road, Astoria, OR 97103, Phone: 503-861-2471


Lewis & Clark Salt Works

Lewis & Clark Salt Works

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The Lewis & Clark Salt Works is another interesting exhibit within the Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks. The Corps of Discovery, a group of early 19th-century voyagers who were part of the Lewis and Clark expedition, reached the Columbia River region of Oregon in the winter of 1805 and set up camp during the cold months.

By the time they arrived, they had run out of precious salt, which had been used to season and preserve the explorers' meals. To compensate, they created the salt works, a furnace system in which they constantly boiled ocean water to extract its salt. The stone furnace still stands and can be visited today, a reminder of the hardships faced by the first expeditioners of the Pacific Northwest.

56 Lewis and Clark Way, Seaside, OR 97138, Phone: 503-861-2471


Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge

Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge

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The Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge is truly off the beaten path as it includes a series of rarely trodden islands in the Columbia River. The 20 islands of the refuge, which are only accessible via boat, cover 27 miles, reaching all the way up to the state of Washington.

The refuge includes a range of different wildlife habitats, such as upland pasture, forested swamps, marshes, and tidal sand flats. These ecosystems create homes for gulls, raptors, songbirds, waterfowl, and many other species. Reptiles, amphibians, and mammals also find space on this 33,000-acre territory, and a great number of fish use the estuary for feeding and spawning. The refuge is popular for boating, hiking, paddling, and wildlife observation.

Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge, OR 97103, Phone: 360-795-3915


Necanicum Estuary Park, Seaside, OR

Necanicum Estuary Park, Seaside, OR

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Although Seaside is best known as a fun beachside tourist town, the region also has much to give in terms of natural beauty. In addition to the many coastal scenes, steep rock bluffs, and dense forests of the area, greater Seaside is also home to the Necanicum Estuary, which is where the Necanicum, Neawanna, and Neacoxie rivers converge.

Here, mudflats are formed at low tide and salt and fresh water mix together, creating a favored fishing spot for many birds of the region. At Necanicum Estuary Park, birdwatchers and lovers of the outdoors can stroll along the grassy marshes and look out for blue and green herons, elk, otters, and other creatures of the estuary. The park also has a wooden walkway and interpretive signs.

1901 N Holladay Dr, Seaside, OR 97138


Oswald West State Park

Oswald West State Park

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Oswald West State Park includes 2,484 acres of sandy beaches and lush temperate rainforest, making it a popular spot for exploring nature and taking in the exquisite Pacific coast. The 4-mile coastline within the park incorporates Short Sand Beach and Smugglers Cove, both of which are favorites for surfers and those who want to enjoy the beach away from the crowds.

These areas provide not only clean sand beaches, but also views of rocky cliffs and thick green forests. Further inland, Oswald West has a number of hiking trails, some of which form part of the famous Oregon Coast Trail. Some of the best hikes lead to breathtaking views at the Cape Falcon and Neahkahnie Mountain headlands.

Oswald West State Park, Arch Cape, OR 97102, Phone: 800-551-6949


Seaside Aquarium, Seaside, Oregon

Seaside Aquarium, Seaside, Oregon

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Seaside Aquarium, which opened its doors in 1937, is one of the West Coast's oldest aquariums. The 1924 building that houses the facility is a treasure in itself, as it maintains its classic look with antique signs and siding. Inside, Seaside Aquarium has many different tanks with crawlers and swimmers from the Pacific Ocean ecosystem. Underwater tanks provide a glimpse into the lives of such ocean dwellers as the sunflower star, nudibranch, and Giant Pacific Octopus.

The touch tank and discovery center provide more interactive experiences in which visitors can actually touch live sea creatures and see microorganisms through microscopes. But the highlight of Seaside Aquarium is its seal family, a group of over ten fun-loving, friendly harbor seals who love attention.

200 North Prom, Seaside, OR 97138, Phone: 503-738-6211


Seaside Carousel

Seaside Carousel

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The Seaside Carousel, located in the Carousel Mall, a kitschy shopping center with a number of small vendors, is a bright and beloved Seaside attraction. The mall is only two short blocks from the beach and the carousel creates a classic beach atmosphere. It keeps an antique, magical feel as it was modeled on exhibits from the San Francisco Carousel Museum.

Children of all ages can ride on one of the traditional horses or climb onboard an ostrich, pig, or other creature spinning around on the carousel platform. Beyond the carousel, the mall features fun shops like an old-time photo booth and a classic malt shoppe.

300 Broadway, Seaside, OR 97138, Phone: 503-738-6728


Seaside Museum & Historical Society

Seaside Museum & Historical Society

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The Seaside Museum and Historical Society is housed in Butterfield Cottage, a quaint beachside house and the site of the town's first seaside resort. The only beach cottage museum in all of Oregon, this museum, which has been fashioned in the style of approximately 1912, depicts the history of Seaside through the exhibits in its halls.

These include photographs, ancient artifacts, and even a diorama of 1899 Seaside. Some of the major themes of the museum are Native American history, the history of logging, and Seaside's hotels throughout the ages. Outdoors, a beautiful flower garden is maintained by volunteers from the historical society.

570 Necanicum Drive, Seaside, OR 97138, Phone: 503-738-7065


Tillamook Head

Tillamook Head

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Tillamook Head is an awe-inspiring promontory that overlooks Oregon's Pacific coast just 5 miles outside the town of Seaside. Situated within Ecola State Park, the rock formation ascends more than 1,000 feet above the water and is covered in Sitka spruce trees. In 1806, the Corps of Discovery crossed the head on a trip to purchase whale blubber from a local Native American tribe.

Captain Clark said of the ocean and island view from Tillamook, “I behold the grandest and most pleasing prospect which my eyes ever surveyed." Hiking trails of varying lengths run through the park at Tillamook Head and the bluff is accessible by foot from Indian Beach.


Turnaround at Seaside

Turnaround at Seaside

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The commemorative statue at the Turnaround at Seaside celebrates Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery, a group of expeditioners who set out from St. Louis, Missouri, in the early 19th century to map the western part of the United States. Their trail ended here in Seaside, where the crew reached the Pacific Ocean.

In the middle of the Turnaround, which is where Broadway meets the famous Seaside Promenade, a tall bronze statue of Lewis and Clark towers above the traffic. Another important figure found in the image is Seaman, the explorers' dog, who accompanied them on the trip out West.

30 N Prom, Seaside, OR 97138


Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area

Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area

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Located in the Oregon Coast Range Mountains, in the northwestern part of Oregon State, the Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area covers 1,114 pristine acres. The area was established to protect a wide range of indigenous and endemic habitats and the wildlife they support; in particular, the wildlife area provides an essential winter habitat for Roosevelt elk. The area has two paved parking areas where visitors can enjoy great wildlife viewing. Elk are observed in large numbers between November and April, while birdlife is prolific all year round. A few rare species you can expect to spot include Bald Eagles, Red-Tailed Hawk, several species of owl and a variety of other birds and mammals.

Jewell Meadows Wildlife Area, 79878 Highway 202, Seaside, OR 97138


Seaside Inverted Experience

Seaside Inverted Experience

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You can make unforgettable memories of your Seaside vacation at the topsy-turvy Seaside Inverted Experience. In a nutshell, the inverted experience is a unique photo studio where you and your friends/family can have a series of crazy upside-down photos taken for you to cherish forever. The studio offers 8 photo sets, each completely different. After your photos have been taken in each of the 8 settings they are yours to keep on your phone. You also get to choose your favorite upside-down photo which will be printed out for you on a glossy souvenir photo. It’s a fun activity the whole family can enjoy.

Seaside Inverted Experience, 111 Broadway, Seaside, OR 97138, 503 470 8040


High Life Adventure Park

High Life Adventure Park

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High Life Adventure Park is home to a thrilling and challenging Aerial Ropes Course, offering hours of good clean fun for all adventure seekers. You can choose your level of difficulty or gradually improve your confidence and work your way up through the levels. The park offers aerial courses suitable for all ages and there will always be helpful staff on hand to assist beginners. The course features 30 aerial platforms (20 or 40 feet above the ground) and there are more than 50 obstacles to test your courage and agility. The park is great for children’s birthday parties, family fun and corporate team-building events.

High Life Adventure Park, 2520 South Roosevelt Dr, Seaside, OR 97138, 503 717 5444


Seaside Golf Course

Seaside Golf Course

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The Seaside Golf Course has been hosting avid golfers since 1923. As avid golfers know, there is nothing more inviting than teeing off on a beautifully manicured course with views of the sea as your backdrop. The 9-hole public course provides ideal conditions for vacation golfers to have some fun, offering great conditions for players of all skills. Although the course is on the short side, interest is added by small, challenging greens. Golfers are welcome to play the course twice so as to enjoy a full 18-hole round of golf. After your round you can enjoy drinks and food at the historic Par-Tee Room clubhouse restaurant which is open for breakfast and lunch. More Romantic Getaways in Oregon

Seaside Golf Course, 451 Avenue U, Seaside, OR 97138, 503-738-5261


RV Resort at Cannon Beach

RV Resort at Cannon Beach

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Cannon Beach is a beautiful spot on the Oregon Coast. The city enjoys warm, dry weather for large parts of the year and is a pristine example of American coastline, with lots of flora and fauna to admire, stunning landscapes in every direction, and no big resorts or buildings breaking up the view. You can enjoy all the quiet beauty and magic of this location at RV Resort at Cannon Beach, which is located right on the oceanfront, mere minutes from the beach. Local attractions include the extensive Ecola State Park for hiking and beach activities, the Tolovana Beach State Recreation Area, and the unique rock formation known as Haystack Rock.

It's a great location for people looking to get away from urban life and really feel at one with nature, and this RV park gives you all you need to have a great stay. RV Resort at Cannon Beach offers full hook-up sites of all sizes to accommodate to all kinds of guests and motor homes. Spread out across lush, tree-lined lands, this site features almost 100 individual RV spaces and comes with a long list of amazing amenities include a large lodge area which features a gift shop, a convenience store, and a game room. You'll also find a meeting/party room which can be used for various special occasions, an indoor swimming pool, a hot tub, a laundromat with coin operated washers and dryers, paved roads and pads, a gas station, picnic tables and firepits, restrooms, and shower.

340 Elk Creek Rd, Cannon Beach, OR 97110, Phone: 503-436-2231


Oceanside RV Resort & Campground

Oceanside RV Resort & Campground

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If you want to explore the Oregon coastline and enjoy all of its unique charms, but still don't want to be too far away from a city with some good quality restaurants and stores, Oceanside RV Resort & Campground is a great choice. This RV park is located in Coos Bay, which is actually the biggest city on the Oregon coast. You'll find a popular casino in the city, along with the beautiful Mingus Park and some interesting museums like Coos Art Museum and Coos History Museum and Maritime Collection, along with some super beaches and very calm waters. in the bay area, ideal for families with young children who want to do a little splashing around without any risk of danger.

Oceanside RV Resort & Campground is part of the highly popular Sun RV Resorts chain, which has locations all around the United States and has received a lot of love due to its awesome amenities and super standards of service. This is a family friendly RV park that is open all year long. Amenities at this Oregon coast RV park include direct beach access, a snack shack selling plenty of tasty treats, a store selling gifts and essentials, a crab cleaning and cooking station, hot showers, clean restrooms, picnic tables, a large communal firepit, access to a golf course, firewood and propane sales, special events like wine tasting, horseshoe pits, and more. This is a pet friendly RV park as well, so you can happily bring a furry friend along for the ride.

90281 Cape Arago Hwy, Coos Bay, OR 97420, Phone: 541-888-2598


Sea & Sand RV Park

Sea & Sand RV Park

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If you're heading off on an RV trip on the Oregon coastline, you definitely don't want to miss out on Depoe Bay. By far one of the top touristic sites on the whole stretch of coastline, Depoe Bay is a small city with barely 1,000 people living there, but it has a lot to offer. It features the world's smallest navigable harbor, for example, and was even used as a filming location for the legendary motion picture, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest. Another unique aspect of this city is its Whale Cove and Depoe Bay Whale Watching Center, with whale watching being a very popular activity on this part of the Oregon coast from the months of March through to December, with a pod of grey whales being regularly seen in the waters of Depoe Bay for large parts of the year.

So if you want to see some whales and make some magical memories, check out Sea & Sand RV Park. Ranked as one of the very best RV parks in Oregon, Sea & Sand RV Park is located right off Highway 101, only a couple of miles away from Depoe Bay. It offers beach and oceanfront views from many of its RV sites and is a perfect spot to enjoy some beach activities, fishing, and whale watching. On-site amenities at this Oregon RV park include clean showers, well-kept restrooms, a dump station, a laundry area with coin operated washers and dryers, dozens of large full hook-up RV spaces, tree-lined spaces, paved roads, high speed Wi-Fi access, and more. This is a pet friendly facility as well, so if you're hoping to travel with a canine companion, you'll be warmly welcomed at Sea & Sand RV Park.

4985 N, US-101, Depoe Bay, OR 97341, Phone: 541-764-2313


25 Best Things to Do in Seaside, Oregon :