When choosing a vacation destination, one of the top questions that enters any traveler’s mind is ‘How are the beaches?’ The beach is the symbol of getting away from regular life; it’s a relaxing, welcoming place where people go to simply kick back and have fun, forgetting their worries and living life to the fullest. Beaches have so much to offer, providing beautiful views and the perfect setting for long, lazy days of lying around soaking up the sun or enjoying a good book. They’re also excellent places for outdoor enthusiasts who like to stay active, with swimming, surfing, jet skiing, wakeboarding, snorkeling, scuba diving, and other great activities all being possible at the beach. CDC information for travelers. Hours/availability may have changed.


1.Kuki'o Beach

Kuki'o Beach
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For nature and animal lovers in the Kona area of Hawaii, Kuki'o Beach is a must-visit location. This beach is popular with people, but it's also beloved by another species: sea turtles. Lots of turtles like to swim around this area and can be spotted coming ashore from time to time too. Of course, visitors are discouraged from getting too close to these animals, but they're stunning to observe from a distance. The silky smooth sands of Kuki'o Beach also make this beach a super spot for relaxing or walking along the shore.

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2.King Kam Beach

King Kam Beach
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Located in downtown Kona, King Kam Beach is a very small but pretty little beach located right by the Kamakahonu National Historic Landmark. The beach, which is also known under the name Kamakahonu Beach, is a super spot for snorkeling and swimming as the surrounding land helps to protect the area, keeping the waters very calm and gentle at all times of year. This Kona beach is also situated right by Kona Pier, which is a very popular gathering point for tourists and locals alike. Fishermen can almost always be found here and there are various charters and fishing rental locations found nearby. In addition, this is a super Kona Beach to observe the sunset, with the sky being illuminated in various reds and oranges every evening and providing a stunning background for some memorable holiday photos.

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3.Koholo Bay

Koholo Bay
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This beautiful bay is divided up into both public and private areas, so you need to be careful about where you go, but the public spots are signposted and it's not too difficult to figure out. Visiting this beach when the tide is low is a great idea, as lots of little tide pools are formed, perfect for exploration and adventures with little ones. Snorkeling and swimming are also popular at this beach and it's a super spot to simply lie back and feel the warmth of the sun washing over you. Just don't forget to bring some sunscreen as there aren't too many shady spots at Kiholo Bay.

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4.Kahalu'u Beach Park

Kahalu'u Beach Park
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Definitely one of the most popular beaches on the entire Big Island and especially in the Kona area, Kahalu'u Beach Park is an extensive area with a lot of great amenities. Rental stalls offer beach equipment at low rates, the local snack bar can keep your energy levels up, and there are plenty of seating areas too. This long, open beach benefits from the presence of a reef not too far off the shore, which helps to keep the waves relatively small and calm. It's a great place to do some snorkeling and swimming, but it's important to note that due to Kahalu'u's beauty and amenities, it can get very crowded at certain times of year, so do your best to arrive early or be prepared to walk around a little in order to find a good spot on the sand.

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5.Kika'ua Point Beach

Kika'ua Point Beach
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There isn't much sand at Kika'ua Point Beach. It's more of a long lagoon with gently sloping banks where visitors can sit and admire the water before diving right in. It's a lovely spot for families to visit as the waters are very warm and exceptionally calm. You probably won't see a single wave at this location, so it's a great Kona beach for families to paddle around in the waters and admire the beauty of the surrounding scenery without any worries or danger. If you have younger children, this is definitely a must-visit spot.

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6.More Info

More Info
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Of all the prime beach destinations on the planet, Hawaii really stands out. The Aloha State, made up of many different islands, has an exceptionally long coastline and an almost never-ending list of breathtaking beaches for everyone to enjoy. No matter where you happen to be in Hawaii, you’re never too far away from the sort of beach that will make your jaw drop and give you magical memories to last a lifetime. The Kona region of Hawaii’s Big Island is an especially popular place for beach-goers of all kinds, and there are a lot of lovely shoreline spots to appreciate and admire around Kona.

Best Beaches in Kona

If you’re heading to the Kona region on the west coast of Hawaii’s Big Island, you’ve got some big decisions to make. Choosing which beach to visit can actually be quite difficult as there are simply so many beautiful spots in the area, but hopefully the information below will be able to help you. We’ve taken a look at Kona’s beaches and highlighted some of the very best spots in the region, noting the various amenities and activities you can enjoy at each location. Read on to learn more.

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5 Best Kona Beaches



More Ideas: The Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory

The chocolate made at the Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory is the only of its kind anywhere in the world. This single-origin artisanal chocolate is grown and made in on the Hawaiian islands with one hundred percent Hawaiian Cacao. The chocolate is made at the company’s factory in the Kona region, situated on the slopes of the Hualalai Mountain. The Kona of the Big Island of Hawaii is bountiful with cacao, and is the home of the one and only Original Hawaiian Chocolate.

The Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory is the first company of its kind to grow, process, hand-pick, and sun-dry cocoa beans that are one hundred percent Hawaiian grown, non-blended to ensure quality and purity. This results in rich, single-origin, delicious Hawaiian chocolate that features a distinctive taste and texture. Milk and Dark Original Hawaiian Chocolate is offered in one-pound bard, individual bar, single large plumerias, and small plumeria-shaped pieces.

The Criollo Dark Chocolate made by the Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory is a rare treat. This chocolate, unique in taste and flavor, is available in single large plumerias and individual bars. The roasted cacao nibs from the factory are the pure essence of chocolate, are are great for smoothies and snacks. The chocolate produced at the factory is grown by select artisan cacao farmers, making Original Hawaiian Chocolate truly one-of-a-kind.

The Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory offers tours of its factory and plantation on Wednesdays at nine in the morning, as well as on Fridays at both nine and eleven in the morning. The plantation and factory walking tour lasts about an hour in duration and includes a tour through the chocolate factory, a walk through the orchard, and of course, a chance to sample some chocolate. Bpb Cooper, one of the owners of Original Hawaiian Chocolate, conducts the tours and share plenty of information about each step in the process of making chocolate, from growing the cacao to molding each chocolate bar.

The Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory is a working active plantation. Because of this, advanced reservations are necessary for anyone wanting to participate in a tour of the plantation and factory. It’s recommended that visitors arrive at the plantation fifteen to twenty minutes before the start time for their tour. Visitors and locals alike can visit the Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory shop on Tuesdays through Fridays, from ten in the morning until three in the afternoon. The chocolate shop is closed on Sundays, Mondays, and Saturdays.

The Kona region of the Island of Hawaii is the home of the unique Original Hawaiian Chocolate. Since the year 1997, the company has been committed to crafting the most unique and delicious chocolates that one hundred percent Hawaiian grown and made. Something about the tropical Hawaiian sun, the Island showers, and the volcanic soil seems to provide the cacao trees with their unique flavor that has become renowned around the world. The Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory is the world’s first producer to grow and process chocolate that is made with one hundred percent Hawaiian cacao.

78-6772 Makenawai St, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, Phone: 808-322-2626

More Ideas: Pu'uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park

Located along 420 acres of the western coast of Hawaii's Big Island, Pu’uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park is a National Historical Park preserving several traditional Hawaiian sites, including a pu'uhonua place of refuge, which allowed legal offenders sanctuary and forgiveness by a priest. The settlement of the Hawaiian islands is believed to date back to at least the fourth century A.D., when indigenous Polynesian settlers arrived from the Marquesas Islands.

History

In 1300, Tahitian settlers are believed to have conquered the islands’ existing settlements, forming much of the native culture encountered by British Captain James Cook upon his exploration of the islands in 1778. Large numbers of native Hawaiians were killed over the following century as the result of the introduction of diseases such as smallpox, measles, and influenza, and following a period of native monarchical rule in the 19th century, much of the islands’ traditional culture was Westernized as a result of the 1898 annexation of Hawaii as a United States territory, and later, its declaration as a state in 1959.

In 1955, 420 acres along the coastline of Hawaii’s Big Island were set aside as part of the City of Refuge National Historical Park, commemorating several traditional Hawaiian structures and important archaeological sites. It was renamed Pu'uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park in 1978, and corrected for traditional Hawaiian language spelling as part of the 2000 Hawaiian National Park Language Correction Act.

Permanent Attractions

Today, the park site includes a number of preserved traditional structures, historical replicas, and findings of archaeological excavations commemorating various aspects of native Hawaiian culture. A Visitor Center at the entrance to the park serves as a check-in point, offering a short orientation film and a bookstore selling handcrafted items by Hawaiian artisans. From the Visitor Center, the park expands through three traditional ahupua'a land units, with sites commemorating more than 400 years of the islands’ indigenous history.

The park’s most notable feature is its preserved traditional pu'uhonua, surrounded by a 965-foot Great Wall. The refuge was traditionally used as a sanctuary for defeated warriors and noncombatants during times of war. Through the 19th century, the pu'uhonua also served as a refuge for legal offenders who broke the culture’s kapu laws, a series of taboos governing codes of conduct related to various aspects of public and private life. Though those violating the kapu were traditionally sentenced to death, the sanctuary provided the option of absolution by a priest and release back into society for offenders who could reach the site without capture. A reconstructed replica of the Hale o Keawe temple, originally built by Kona chief Kanuha, is showcased, along with the remains of several older heiau temples.

Along Honaunau Bay, the Royal Grounds area preserves several residential and ceremonial sites used by Hawaiian ali’i royalty, which comprised one of the major political and religious centers within the island’s Kona district. Attractions within the grounds include a halau wa’a canoe house, three holua racing slides, and a site for playing konane, a traditional Hawaiian pebble strategy game which visitors may receive rules for at the Visitor Center. Nearby, the remains of Ki’ilae Village, an abandoned traditional fishing and farming village, offer a glimpse of life on the islands around the time of the arrival of European explorers.

Several hiking trails are provided throughout the park, including the two-mile 1871 Trail through agricultural sites and backcountry areas overlooking the Keanae'e cliffs. Recreational fishing is allowed at the park, following compliance of regulations by the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources. Though snorkelers are asked to avoid entering the water at the sacred Keone'ele Cove site, the nearby “two-step” snorkeling area is located just outside the park’s grounds. Green sea turtles and native bats may be seen at various places within the park, and picnicking grounds offer dramatic views of the Pacific Coast.

Ongoing Programs and Education

Live cultural demonstrations of traditional hana no'eau skills are presented at the park on Sundays through Thursdays, highlighting crafts such as basket weaving and lauhala bracelet making. Traditional Hawaiian game lessons are offered periodically, and ancient storytelling is offered by resident demonstrator Kahaka'io Ravenscraft.

Ranger-led tours and excursions are offered periodically, including Hawaiian Polynesian Plant Tours elaborating on the area’s native wildlife and its role in Hawaiian culture. Field trips for student and scout groups are offered, incorporating curriculum requirements into guided tours, and a Junior Ranger program allows youth visitors to complete park activities in exchange for a completion badge and certificate. A Hawaii Island National Parks Adventure Book is also provided for families visiting other nearby National Parks on the Big Island.

State Hwy 160, Honaunau, HI 96726, Phone: 808-328-2326

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